This website is intended for Medical Professionals only. By using this site you confirm that you are a healthcare professional.

News
Marriage may protect against heart ... A global study led by Keele University has found that marriage ... (20 Jun 2018)
Risk of burnout can be estimated by ... According to calculations from the World Health Organisation, ... (20 Jun 2018)
Obesity in women and current smoking in men ... Study shows 46% of women and 38% of men with early rheumatoid ... (20 Jun 2018)
Study suggests siblings of patients with ...  Patients with rheumatoid arthritis and their siblings were 44% ... (19 Jun 2018)
Gout in the elderly linked to higher risk of ... The results of a study presented at the Annual European Congress ... (20 Jun 2018)
Sunday, 11 June 2017 06:58

Certain Cardiovascular Medications May Increase Risk of Falling Featured

Rate this item
(0 votes)

A new analysis suggests that among older adults who take cardiovascular medications, those using non-selective beta-blockers may be at an increased of falling compared with those using selective beta-blockers. These types of drugs are already known to differ by their receptor binding properties and their systemic effects on the body.

In the analysis of data from 2 prospective studies involving more than 10,000 individuals, use of a selective beta-blocker was not associated with fall risk, but use of a non-selective beta-blocker was associated with a 22% increased risk. In total, 2,917 participants encountered a fall during follow-up.

The results indicate that fall risk should be considered when weighing the pros and cons of prescribing different beta-blocker classes for older individuals.

“Drug-related falls remain under-recognized, leading to preventable falls and related injury. Precise prediction of drug-related fall risk is of major importance for clinical decision-making,” said Dr. Nathalie van der Velde, senior author of the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology study. “Knowledge of type-specific effects such as selectivity in beta-blockers can be expected to improve decision-making.”



Source: Wiley
Full bibliographic information:
Beta-blocker use and fall risk in older individuals; original results from two studies with meta-analysis. . British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

Read 1245 times

TheSynapse Videos

0
0
0
0
0
0

Latest news

Highlights

  • WASP Course in Bahrain

    WASP Course, led by Prof Victor Grech and Prof Charles Savona Ventura, has recently organised a course in Bahrain. Co-hosted with Arabian Gulf University, the course, on how to write a scientific paper, focused on quantitative analysis methods and was targeted for medical doctors and allied health professionals.

    Written on April 24, 2018 Read more...

SPONSOR MESSAGE

Join

Connect with other Medical Professionals on fb in a closed facebook group

Login

Template Settings

Theme Colors

Cyan Red Green Oranges Teal

Layout

Wide Boxed Framed Rounded
Patterns for Layour: Boxed, Framed, Rounded
Top
We use cookies to improve our website. By continuing to use this website, you are giving consent to cookies being used. More details…